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Declaring tax in Denmark

If you work and pay tax in Denmark, you must also declare tax there. You can do this easily online on the website for the Danish Skattestyrelsen with a NemID or your CPR-number and a TastSelv-kode.
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This information is for EU citizens only.

Submitting a Danish declaration online

If you pay tax in Denmark, you must also declare tax there. In the beginning of March, you will find your tax assessment notice (årsopgørelse) in TastSelv on Skattestyrelsen's website. Here you will also find information about what fields you need to fill in. You can find further information on how to fill in your Danish tax declaration at Øresunddirekt when the declaration time approaches.

E-declaring with TastSelv

You fill in your declaration via Skattestyrelsen's electronic service TastSelv. You use your NemID to log in and from there you will have access to your årsopgørelse, as well as your other Danish tax documents. You can also use your Danish CPR number and a TastSelv code to log on. If you forget your code, you can request a new code from Skattestyrelsen's website. 

 

When you use TastSelv, you can see the result of your tax declaration on the screen. You can find information on the different tax models in our article about deductions for the different taxation modes.

Do I have to declare my Danish income in Sweden? 

If you live in Sweden you must also submit a Swedish tax declaration, even if all of your earnings are in Denmark. Inform the Swedish tax authorities of your Danish income under "övriga upplysningar" (other information) on the declaration form.

 

If you have Danish income on which you pay tax in Sweden, you can use the conversion rate of DKK 100 = SEK 129,49 (2017) (the Riksbank's average rate). This applies to people such as Danish employees who live in Sweden and have carried out part of their work in Sweden.